Easy Hawaiian Recipes

Chicken Long Rice

(By Stephanie L. Dela Cruz)

chicken long rice

Chicken Long Rice is Hawaii's riff on chicken noodle soup, flavored with fresh ginger, garlic, and onions. We use bean thread noodles instead of pasta which also makes a nice gluten-free alternative. Easy and delicious Hawaiian home cooking.

Ingredients:

Directions:

In a large pot w/ lid on medium high heat, add chicken broth, water, ginger, onion halves, garlic, shoyu, and about 1/2 tsp of black pepper. Bring to boil then reduce heat to medium low and add in chicken. Cover and poach chicken for 20-25 minutes.

In separate bowl cover bean thread noodles with enough cold water to cover and let soak about 15 minutes to soften. Drain water then use kitchen shears to cut noodles into manageable pieces. Set aside.

Remove chicken as well as the ginger, garlic, onion with slotted spoon. When chicken is cool enough to handle, shred into bite sized pieces with your hands (or you can chop it up) and place back in pot. Discard ginger etc.

Bring heat up to medium-high, add noodles and green onions. Cover and let cook 8-10 minutes stirring occasionally. Serve hot Makes 6-8 servings

*Chicken Long Rice is meant to be more Noodle-y than soupy. If you prefer more broth, use 3 containers of chicken broth instead of two, and add an extra tablespoon of shoyu.

**Saifun bean thread noodles can be found at most stores in the Asian food section.

 

Kailua Pig

(By Stephanie L. Dela Cruz)

Kailua Pork

You can't have a luau (loo-ow) without the star attraction- kalua pig. The traditional way of cooking this porktastic feast involves a whole pig, digging a pit in the ground, finding a bunch of lava rocks and keawe (kay-ah-vay) (mesquite) wood, heating everything up to the right temperature, seasoning the pig, putting hot lava rocks in the cavity, then into the pit and cover with banana leaves and wet burlap to lock in the heat and moisture and cook for most of the day. Now you can make kalua pig in a crock pot or oven so you won't have to work too hard for some flavorful and succulent pork for your next get together.

Ingredients:

Directions:

Rub pork butt with liquid smoke making sure to get in all the nooks and crannies, then do the same with the salt.

Crock pot instructions:

Place pork in crock pot on low setting and cook 6-8 hours. The general rule of thumb is 45-60 minutes per pound. When pork is done, shut off heat and let it sit covered for 30 minutes before handling, then follow instructions below.

Oven directions:

Place pork in dutch oven with lid and cook 8-10 hours at 225-250 degrees. Let cool 30 minutes in pot before handling.

Time to break down the pork- please don't skip this part as it really does make a difference when it comes to this dish. When cool enough to handle, remove pork and reserve the cooking liquid minus the fat. If you have a fat separator this is the perfect time to use it. The rule of thumb is this: If it's fatty, gristly, stringy or bone, throw it out. All you want is pure meat. Shred the meat with your hands into fine pieces and be sure to mix the light and dark meat together. When this process is done, add about 1/2- 2/3 cup of the reserved cooking liquid to moisten the pork. mix again with your hands. Taste and add more liquid or salt if needed.

Makes 8-10 servings

Volcanic Shrimp

(by Stephanie L. dela Cruz)

Volcanic Shrimp

Garlicky shrimp tossed in a fiery flavorful sauce. It might best be described as a cross between buffalo shrimp and scampi. Makes for a great appetizer but can also be served on a bed of pasta as a spicy dinner option. Which ever way you choose, it's fast, easy and ono (delicious).

Ingredients:


Directions:

In small pot over medium-low heat melt butter, then add hot sauce and lemon juice. Stir and reduce heat to low. Heat a saute pan to medium-high and add 1-2 tablespoons oil, half the garlic, half the shrimp, pinch of salt and cook about 30 seconds per side. Best to do in 2 separate batches so the pan doesn't get overcrowded. Set first batch aside on plate, and repeat.

When second batch is done, reduce heat to medium and put all the shrimp back into the saute pan and add the melted butter/hot sauce. Toss to coat well and warm through, then add parsley. Serve immediately Makes 4-6 servings

*21-30 count shrimp means that they average 21 to 30 pieces of shrimp per pound. The lower the number, the larger the shrimp.

**Try it for dinner by serving it atop a bed of cooked linguine or spaghetti noodles with some garlic bread.

 

Chili Pepper Water

(by Stephanie L. dela Cruz)

Chili Pepper Water

Chili pepper water is a classic local condiment used to spice and flavor local dishes and can be found in many homes throughout the islands. If you enjoy hot sauce on different foods, this is a delicious item to have on hand. There are variations on what people put in their chili pepper water, but the main ingredients are local chili peppers, Hawaiian salt, garlic, and water.

Ingredients

Directions:

In small saucepan bring water to boil. Add salt, stir until dissolved then add in chiles, garlic, and vinegar. Let boil for 1-2 minutes then remove from heat and place into clean jar or container. Can be used right away but tastes best if you make it a day ahead. Keeps for about a week. Store in refrigerator.

 

Mahi Mahi with Mango Salsa

(by Stephanie L. dela Cruz)

Mahi Mahi with Mango Salsa

Mahi-mahi (mah-hee-mah-hee) is one of the many wonderful fishes that can be found in the beautiful blue waters of Hawaii. It is also known as the Dolphinfish but is in no way related to our flippered friends. It has a firm texture, mild in taste, and versatile to cook with. This is a light and healthy dish combining another Hawaiian staple: Mangoes. Sweet, ripe mangoes tossed with lime, onions, cilantro, with a little kick from serrano peppers.

Ingredients:


For Mango Salsa:


Directions: Combine all the above ingredients in a bowl and mix well, but gently. Cover and refrigerate 15-30 minutes while you're preparing the mahi-mahi fillets.

For the Mahi-mahi:

Pat fillets dry with paper towel then coat with a little canola oil on both sides (so fish won't stick when cooking) then season both sides with a little salt/pepper.

You can choose to either grill the fish or cook it on the stove. Either way, you want to cook it 5-6 minutes per side on medium-high heat. If you are cooking on the stove, add a couple tablespoons of canola oil to the pan before adding the fish.

Top cooked mahi fillets with a nice portion of mango salsa and serve.

Makes 8 servings

 

Lomi Lomi Salmon

(by Stephanie L. dela Cruz)

Lomi Lomi Salmon

Lomi-lomi (low-mee low-mee) salmon is another classic Hawaiian dish most commonly found at a luau (loo-ow) and easy enough to make for any occasion that strikes your fancy. You typically lomi-lomi (Hawaiian for massage) fresh salmon with salt and let it cure overnight then mix it with tomatoes and sweet onion. This version doesn't make you wait overnight before you can eat, so you can save the lomi-lomi part for yourself.

Ingredients:

For the salted salmon:


Directions:

In a small bowl add diced salmon and salt. Mix well, cover and refrigerate 6-8 hours. Give it a stir every couple of hours.

Mix tomatoes, onions, green onion, and 1 teaspoon of salt together in a bowl then transfer to a gallon sized food storage bag and let chill in the fridge while the salmon is quick curing. (You want everything to be well chilled). When salmon is ready give it a light rinse under cold water, drain well and pat any excess water off with a paper towel. Take out bag with the tomato mixture and clip off a small corner of the bag to drain off liquid then place everything in a bowl. Add diced salmon and mix well. Taste and adjust salt if needed. Serve chilled.

Makes 8-10 servings